26.8.12

DOMINO DAD SABERTOOTH








I wonder about the quality and legitimacy and timbre and beauty and power of nonsense, I guess. Sorry if this is incredibly pretentious.
DOMINO DAD SABERTOOTH began as a motet based on a text piece and weird quasi-automatic writing exercise I started a number of years ago where I re-wrote the Latin Requiem Mass as a hybrid of what I seemed to hear when listening and what I seemed to see when glancing at the latin text simultaneously. From an excerpt of my text, what I sing here is:
DOMINO DAD, SABERTOOTH
REQUIRE ETERNAL DOGS, DOMINO
HUMMUS JUBILEE.
The rest is basically just like that. i.e. the Sanctus became "Sandwich." I want to know what is lost or gained in traditional vocal music forms when the text is understood as something totally stupid. Most of us understand that a requiem is supposed to be pretty and sad. It sounds pretty and sad; does it matter that I'm singing about sandwiches?
I composed the vocal parts to resemble the puritanical polyphony of Renaissance British dudes like Byrd, Tallis, etc. Sometimes broken, as if lost in transmission.
I'm currently really interested in the idea of glossolalia and religious nonsense and the legitimacy of the transcendental voice and whatnot, and my dear friend Noé gave me a double album of really excellent recordings of such things, a few of which I included in this piece. I refrained from processing them because they're such powerful recordings.
Leslie Flint speaking as Charlotte Bronte, 1973
Glossolalia at the Pentecostal Church, Ohio 1980s
Exorcism of Anneliese Michel, 1976.
The rest is my voice with my gear.